Prescription Drugs
Prescription drugs and their relationships with Chiral Balance D-chiro-inositol.

The short answer is that DCI is not known to interfere with any medications. We don't recommend you take it with androgen antagonists, but only because they may both work too well.

We always recommend you speak to your doctor before combining any supplement with prescription drugs. The following is for informational purposes only:


Oral Contraceptives

Oral contraceptive pills do not interfere with the function of DCI or vice versa. However, taking birth control can mask the symptoms of PCOS, making it difficult to evaluate whether DCI is having the desired effects. Always consult your physician before discontinuing a birth control regimen.



Spironolactone

Spironolactone (brand names: Aldactone and Spiractin) is an aldosterone antagonist and moderates responsiveness to androgens as well. The medication is often prescribed to manage some of the symptoms of PCOS related to hyperandrogenism, such as hirsutism, androgenic alopecia, and acne. Spironolactone is an anti-diuretic. The medication's anti-androgenic effects are secondary and result from competitively binding to androgen receptors, thereby preventing testosterone and dihydrotestosterone from acting. The drug has side effects.


DCI addresses hyperandrogenism by restoring insulin sensitivity, while Spironolactone addresses the elevated testosterone. Their very distinct mechanisms suggest little likelihood for interaction. However, we do not recommend that you take DCI with spironolactone or other androgen antagonists unless directed by your physician.



Metformin

Metformin (brand names: Glucophage, Glumetza, Fortamet and Riomet) addresses the insulin resistance commonly associated with PCOS. This drug inhibits gluconeogenesis and may strengthen the interaction between insulin and its receptors, thereby enhancing the insulin response. For some people, metformin effectively normalizes insulin sensitivity and can promote ovulation. Metformin has side effects.


DCI addresses insulin resistance in a different way. There is evidence that women with PCOS are deficient in DCI. Taking DCI supplements ensures your the body has sufficient DCI to respond to to insulin normally. DCI has shown no side effects in clinical trials.


DCI addresses the suggested cause of insulin resistance, whereas, Metformin addresses the symptoms. Consequently, no interaction between Chiral Balance DCI and Metformin has been reported.



TZD Drugs

Thiazolidinediones such as Actos and Avandia are prescribed to address the insulin resistance commonly associated with PCOS. Called TZD drugs or Glitazones, these drugs are often tried after metformin. Avandia and metformin are sometimes prescribed simultaneously as the combination drug Avandamet. The drugs bind to PPARs, a modulating transcription of insulin-sensitive genes related to metabolism. In a sense, these drugs circumvent the steps of insulin signal transduction that are dysfunctional in insulin resistance. TZD drugs have side effects.


DCI addresses insulin resistance in a different way. There is evidence that women with PCOS are deficient in DCI. A DCI supplement ensures the body has sufficient DCI to respond to insulin normally.


DCI addresses the suggested cause of insulin resistance whereas TZD drugs address the symptoms. DCI showed no side effects in clinical trials.



Clomid/Clomiphene Citrate

The drug clomiphene citrate (brand names: Clomid, Clomifert, Serophene, Milophene) is used to induce ovulation and is a common drug used in treating infertility due to anovulation. DCI can be taken safely in conjunction with clomiphene. The insulin sensitizer N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) has been found in one clinical trial to improve the effectiveness of clomiphene. DCI, like NAC, is also an insulin sensitizer and consequently may also improve results for a course of clomiphene. In summary, DCI can be taken safely in conjunction with clomiphene, and it may even be beneficial.